Twas in the moon of wintertime

Here’s a Christmas Carol that you might not be familiar with. I was first introduced to it in Louise Penny’s book How the Light Gets In. Now it’s one of my favorite songs of the season.huron carol stamp

The Huron Carol is Canada’s oldest Christmas song. It was written in the Huron language in 1642 by Jean de Brébeuf, a Jesuit missionary at Sainte-Marie among the Hurons in Canada. The song’s melody is based on a traditional French folk song, “Une Jeune Pucelle” (“A Young Maid”). Tragically Father de Brébeuf was martyred in 1649 by the Iroquois.

The English version, written in 1926 by Jesse Edgar Middleton, uses imagery more familiar in the early 20th century rather than the classic Nativity story.

“Jesus is born in a “lodge of broken bark” and wrapped in a “robe of rabbit skin”. He is surrounded by hunters instead of shepherds, and the Magi are portrayed as “chiefs from afar” who bring him “fox and beaver pelts” instead of the more familiar gold, frankincense, and myrrh. The hymn also uses a traditional Algonquian name, Gitchi Manitou, for God.”

 

A Response to ‘Women Against Feminism.’

edesorban:

Well said!

Originally posted on iwantedwings:

Imagine this:

The year is 2014. You are a white Western woman. You wake up in the morning in a comfortably sized house or flat. You have a full or part-time job that enables you to pay your rent or mortgage. You have been to school and maybe even college or university as well. You can read and write and count. You own a car or have a driver’s licence. You have enough money in your own bank account to feed and clothe yourself. You have access to the Internet. You can vote. You have a boyfriend or girlfriend of your choosing, who you can also marry if you want to, and raise a family with. You walk down the street wearing whatever you feel like wearing. You can go to bars and clubs and sleep with whomever you want.

Your world is full of freedom and possibility.

Then you…

View original 1,415 more words

It’s that time of year…

edesorban:

Someone you know suffers from Depression. Sometimes it’s the situation. Sometimes it’s the change of season.
The worst is when the darkness descends for no visible reason.
Depression is a flaw in chemistry, not in character.
Take care of yourself.

Originally posted on Escaping Elegance:

IMG_0982.JPG
I love the fact that World Mental Health Day is in the Autumn (at least, here in the Northern Hemisphere) because there is no better time for people to be encouraged to talk about mental health.

As I wrote about here, I live with dysthymia and I am also susceptible to major depressive episodes that are triggered by low serotonin levels.

In other words… I can get really, really sad when the days start getting shorter.

In our busy lives, it is all too easy to explain away the change of mood that sometimes accompanies the change of seasons. The carefree days of summer are over, of course I’m no longer feeling so happy… right?

Well, maybe… but unless I remember that I need to get outside and see the sun during the day and that I need to exercise to work up some endorphins, then that “normal” post-summer…

View original 77 more words

The perfect song for cycling and singing out loud – thanks to the BBC and the Beach Boys

edesorban:

What a delightful video! Thanks Kevin!
I expect this will be playing in my head for the next few days.

Originally posted on I Do Not Despair:

I do not despair is currently distracted from blogging.

It is bid-writing season again – the process of developing a sales pitch to funders that part exam revision, part interview, part dissertation, part speech writing and a lot of hours locked away with the laptop. There is sadly little capacity left for the blog for another few days yet.

My saving grace is the bike ride to work, an hour or more of tranquility to reorganise my thoughts.

And there is music. This isn’t just while writing. As my regular readers know “Music to Ride bikes by” celebrates the songs that come into my head while riding and just won’t go away.

Today I just have to celebrate the work of the BBC Music department that has just produced a brilliant version of “God only Knows” to celebrate the joy of music. In time to a pedalling rhythm it is…

View original 50 more words

Greatⁿ-Grandma Katalin, Hajdú Warrior

edesorban:

I have been working on writing stories about my family in context. Finding the right historical sources is challenging. The next step is sifting through the information to figure out my people’s part in history. I really enjoyed the discovery that my way-back Grandmother came from a family of renegade outlaw soldier types and then became a noble.

Originally posted on Édes-Orbán Family:

kato egri copyKerekes Katalin is hands down my favorite ancestor. Our lineage gets a little fuzzy in the 17th century so I’m not sure how many ‘greats’ apply. In the early 1600s Katalin was fighting by the side of her warrior husband, Édes Gergely, and his brothers. She received nobility in her own name because of her valor. This was no small accomplishment at a time when women were considered less than human. She was “a big strong armed woman who fought like an animal’ according to the patent of nobility. Her husband’s family was from Székelyföld. No word about her dad, but Katalin’s mother was a hajdú.

The hajdúk (plural for hajdú) had been peasant cattle drovers on the puszta, the eastern plains of Hungary. Driving herds of the big grey long-horned ‘Magyar szürkemarha to market, they had to become fierce fighters to defend themselves on the…

View original 580 more words

the place where Hungary meets Slovakia

edesorban:

We will be driving when we go this summer, but if traffic allows I will stop in the middle. Thanks for this delightful post!

Originally posted on my world of melancholly:

One of the places where you can “officially” leave Hungary, is the Erzsébet-bridge between Komárom in Hungary and Komárno in Slovakia. It was built in 1892 an is named after Romy Schneider Empress Elisabeth of Austria, because we Hungarians have always loved our Sisi, even during her lifetime, which is a rare phenomenon and is not very characteristic for the Hungarian collective spirit. Usually we first appreciate people after their death (if at all, haha). While it’ s definitely not the most charming spot on Earth or even in Hungary, it’s still a border, and I love borders. So here is a guide on how to cross them.

1. Walk up to the bridge.

Komárno Erzsébet-híd 1

2. Keep walking.

Komárno Erzsébet-híd 4

3. Look back at Hungary (yes, I did shop at that Tesco. I was that hungry).

Komárom Tesco

4. Admire the Danube (not a particularly breathtaking sight for somebody who is such a mountain person like…

View original 39 more words